Experience the Health Benefits of Cinnamon

Cinnamon is becoming a popular supplement among diabetics for it’s components and their effect on blood glucose and cholesterol. Several studies suggest that cinnamon may have a regulatory effect on blood sugar, and an anti-clotting effect on the blood. Based on recent studies, cinnamon may lower blood glucose, triglycerides and LDL cholesterol in people with Type 2 diabetes.

The results of a study from 2003 in Pakistan showed lower levels of fasting glucose, triglycerides, LDL cholesterol and total cholesterol after 40 days with levels continuing to drop for 20 days after that. The study was made up of 60 people with Type 2 diabetes divided into 6 groups of 10. Three groups received cinnamon in the form of capsules totaling 1, 3 or 6 grams of cinnamon a day. The other three groups received placebo capsules. The capsules were taken three times a day, after meals. All of the levels of cinnamon intake showed results, leading researchers to believe that as little as 1 gram a day of cinnamon may be especially beneficial for people with Type 2 diabetes.

Cinnamon has many other health benefits in addition to supporting normal blood glucose and cholesterol. In Midevil times cinnamon was used to treat coughing, hoarseness and sore throats. This spice has also shown an amazing ability to stop medication-resistant yeast infections. In a study at Copenhagen University, patients given half a teaspoon of cinnamon powder combined with one tablespoon of honey every morning before breakfast had significant relief in arthritis pain after one week and could walk without pain within one month. When added to food, cinnamon inhibits bacterial growth and food spoilage, making it a natural food preservative. One study found that smelling cinnamon boosts cognitive function and memory. Researchers at Kansas State University found that cinnamon fights the E. coli bacteria in unpasteurized juices. It is also a great source of manganese, fiber, iron, and calcium.

New research is currently being developed on the amazing effects of cinnamon. All of this information proves that cinnamon is an extremely beneficial herb for promoting overall wellness.

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Sources: Khan, MS, PHD, Alam, Safdar, MS, Mahpara, Ali Khan, MS, PHD, Mohammad Muzaffar, Khattak, MS, Khan Nawaz, and Anderson, PHD, Richard A.. “Cinnamon Improves Glucose and Lipids of People With Type 2 Diabetes.” Diabetes Care 26(2003): 3215-3218.

Black Cohosh: Natural Remedy for Hot Flashes, PMS & More!

Black Cohosh has been used as an herbal remedy in North American Indian medicine for hundreds years for treating a variety of illness. It is more commonly known for it’s benefits on female health issues including, pms, cramps, hormonal imbalances, and menopause symptoms such as hot flashes and depression. It also has a balancing effect on hormone production, particularly estrogen. Black Cohosh has also been used as a natural remedy for helping to relieve symptoms of malaise, gynecological disorders, kidney disorders, malaria, rheumatism, sore throat, colds, cough, constipation, hives, backaches and to induce lactation.

In 19th-century America, Black Cohosh was a home remedy used for rheumatism and fever, as a diuretic, and to bring on menstruation. It was extremely popular among a group of alternative practitioners who called black cohosh “macrotys” and prescribed it for rheumatism, lung conditions, neurological conditions, and conditions that affected women’s reproductive organs including menstrual problems, inflammation of the uterus or ovaries, infertility, threatened miscarriage, and relief of labor pains.

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Rhodiola Rosea Herb can Help to Reduce Stress

Rhodiola Rosea or “Golden Root” can help our bodies adapt to stress. It has been used in the traditional medicine of Russia, Scandinavia, and other countries. Between 1748 and 1961 various medicinal applications of Rhodiola Rosea appeared in the scientific literature of Sweden, Norway, France, Germany, the Soviet Union, and Iceland. Since 1961, more than 180 pharmacological, phytochemical and clinical studies have been published.

Although Rhodiola Rosea has been extensively studied as an adaptogen with various health-promoting effects, it’s properties remain largely unknown in the West. This may be partially due to the fact that the bulk of research has been published in Slavic and Scandinavian languages.

Traditional folk medicine used Rhodiola Rosea to increase physical endurance, work productivity, longevity, resistance to high altitude sickness, and to treat fatigue, depression, anemia, impotence, gastrointestinal ailments, infections, and nervous system disorders. In mountain villages of the Republic of Georgia, a bouquet of roots is still given to couples prior to marriage to enhance fertility and assure the birth of healthy children. In Middle Asia, Rhodiola Rosea tea was the most effective treatment for cold and flu during severe Asian winters. Mongolian doctors prescribed it for tuberculosis and cancer. For centuries, only family members knew where to harvest the wild “golden roots” and the methods of extraction. Siberians secretly transported the herb down ancient trails to the Caucasian Mountains where it was traded for Georgian wines, fruits, garlic, and honey. Chinese emperors sent expeditions to Siberia to bring back the “golden root” for medicinal preparations.

Rhodiola Rosea has also been used as an astringent and for the treatment of hernia, leucorrhoea (vaginal discharge), hysteria, and headache. In 1755 Rhodiola Rosea was included in the first Swedish Pharmacopoeia. Vikings used the herb to enhance their physical strength and endurance. German researchers described the benefits of Rhodiola Rosea for pain, headache, scurvy, hemorrhoids, as a stimulant, and as an anti-inflammatory.

There are still more scientific studies being held in which scientists are exploring its diverse physiological effects. Future medical applications are being developed including medicines to treat diseases such as cancer and radiation sickness, and enhancing physical and mental performance.

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Increase Sexual Desire & Intimacy with all Natural Macuna Pruriens

Macuna Pruriens is commonly known as cowhage (Latin) and kiwanch (Sanskrit). Traditionally, Mucuna pruriens find use in number of diseases and is commonly used as carminative, hypotensive & hypoglycemic agent. From phytochemistry point of view, the drug contains L-dopa, tryptamine alkaloids, lecithin and tannins.

Traditionally Macuna Pruriens has been used to increase sexual desire and ability, The seeds of the mucuna pruriens plant produce chemicals that support healthy levels of testosterone in both men and women. It also aids in the production of a hormone commonly associated with the “pleasure system” of the brain, providing feelings of enjoyment and motivation.

L-Dopa is an amino acid that converts into dopamine. Dopamine is an essential component of our body and it’s required for proper functioning of the brain. Research discovered the body converts the amino acid tyrosine into L-dopa; L-dopa is then converted into dopamine. Without the neurotransmitter dopamine to serve a damping effect on neural transmissions, muscles become tense and tremble.

L- Dopa contains natural secretagogues which may support the body’s ability to stimulate the natural release of growth hormone. The blood carries the dopamine into the brain, where it naturally increases HGH production from the pituitary gland. The increased dopamine levels also optimize the production of other hormones, including testosterone, leading to increased sex drive and improved sexual performance for both men and women, beneficial in stimulating muscle growth, as well as burning fat from fat cells.

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Natural Diuretics to Promote Healthy Urination

Alfalfa, Corn Silk , dandelion, gravel root, horsetail, hydrangea, hyssop, juniper berries, oat straw, parsley, seawrack, thyme, uva ursi, white ash and yarrow can be used in tea form for their diuretic properties.

Diuretics promote the formation of urine by the kidney. All diuretic drugs cause a person to “lose water” enhancing the excretion of both sodium and chloride in the urine so that water is excreted with them.

The Potential of Pomegranate

Pomegranate is the most powerful anti-oxidant of all fruits
It contains Potent anti-cancer and immune supporting effects
Pomegranate Discourages platelet aggregation that could cause heart attacks, strokes and embolic disease
Lowers cholesterol and other cardiac risk factors
Lowers blood pressure

Additional medicinal benefits of pomegranates:

Atherosclerosis – Due to its richness of flavonoids and antioxidant vitamins C and E, pomegranates prevent atherosclerosis. In a recent study, patients who took a glass of pomegranate juice every day felt better after 10 days of start taking it.

Degenerative illnesses – Due to its content of antocianines (pigments of red and blue color known as flavonoids) and vitamins C and E, pomegranates stop the aging process and appearance of degenerative illnesses.

Blood purifier – A long treatment with pomegranate juice detoxifies and regenerates the blood. Pomegranates are known as “the queen” of naturopath geriatrics; they are excellent nutrition for old people as well as children.

Diabetes – Pomegranates are an excellent fruit for diabetics because they do not raise blood sugar. They protect them against atherosclerosis and hypertension, two major risks for diabetics.

Menopause – Due to their content of estrogens, pomegranates are recommended to prevent discomforts caused by menopause. Japanese women eat this fruit to prevent such discomforts.

Anti-anemia – Because of its richness in minerals, vitamin C and copper, pomegranate juice is well known for is anti-anemia effects. Pomegranates improve anemia cause by iron deficiency.

Chronic inflammations – Pomegranate juice, taken before breakfast and half hour before meals is quite effective to fight laryngitis, sinusitis, and ear inflammation with suppuration.

Pomegranates are fast becoming known as one of the healthiest foods we can eat, largely because of their beneficial effects on cardiovascular health. The benefit of supplementing with pomegranate extract (rather than drinking the juice or eating the fruit) is that the extract, unlike the juice, contains virtually no sugar or calories, and requires no refrigeration to maintain optimal quality.

**Pomegranate is considered a dietary supplement, so make sure you talk to your doctor before you start drinking it regularly. Pomegranate juice may interact with some prescription medications, such as certain high blood pressure medications and statins.

Memory Boosting Herbs for Alzheimer’s Patients

Alzheimer’s patients experience inflammation of the brain, deposits of beta amyloid, traces of heavy metals and signs of oxidative stress.

Brahmi, a semi-aquatic plant, acts on all of these, says Con Stough, director of the National Institute of Complementary Medicine (NICM) involved in trials underway at Swinburne University of Technology Brain Sciences Institute (BSI).

“It has an anti-inflammatory effect, is an antioxidant and collates and removes heavy metals and beta amyloid,” he said.

Two trials with a brahmi extract conducted over 90 days, have shown improvements in working memory, particularly spatial memory accuracy.

Pine bark, lemon balm, American ginseng, rosemary and brahmi, are some of the herbs showing promise in fending off Alzheimer’s dementia, causing memory loss, depression and anxiety.

A 50-day trial of a particular pine bark extract supplement for men aged 50 to 65 years has also shown improved speed in spatial working memory and immediate recognition tasks, along with lowering blood pressure.

Another trial is investigating the short-term calmative effects of a special lemon balm product, because anxiety and agitation are major symptoms that Alzheimer sufferers experience.

Andrew Scholey, who heads BSI’s Herbal and Nutritional Medicine Research Unit, said that historically the field of alternative medicine has struggled to gain scientific credibility.

“However, Swinburne’s trials are performed to standards that provide acceptance within the mainstream scientific community,” added Scholey.

Consumer research indicates that more and more people are using some form of alternative health products as part of a proactive, preventative health strategy.