Archive for the ‘Diabetes’ Category

Experience the Health Benefits of Cinnamon

Cinnamon is becoming a popular supplement among diabetics for it’s components and their effect on blood glucose and cholesterol. Several studies suggest that cinnamon may have a regulatory effect on blood sugar, and an anti-clotting effect on the blood. Based on recent studies, cinnamon may lower blood glucose, triglycerides and LDL cholesterol in people with Type 2 diabetes.

The results of a study from 2003 in Pakistan showed lower levels of fasting glucose, triglycerides, LDL cholesterol and total cholesterol after 40 days with levels continuing to drop for 20 days after that. The study was made up of 60 people with Type 2 diabetes divided into 6 groups of 10. Three groups received cinnamon in the form of capsules totaling 1, 3 or 6 grams of cinnamon a day. The other three groups received placebo capsules. The capsules were taken three times a day, after meals. All of the levels of cinnamon intake showed results, leading researchers to believe that as little as 1 gram a day of cinnamon may be especially beneficial for people with Type 2 diabetes.

Cinnamon has many other health benefits in addition to supporting normal blood glucose and cholesterol. In Midevil times cinnamon was used to treat coughing, hoarseness and sore throats. This spice has also shown an amazing ability to stop medication-resistant yeast infections. In a study at Copenhagen University, patients given half a teaspoon of cinnamon powder combined with one tablespoon of honey every morning before breakfast had significant relief in arthritis pain after one week and could walk without pain within one month. When added to food, cinnamon inhibits bacterial growth and food spoilage, making it a natural food preservative. One study found that smelling cinnamon boosts cognitive function and memory. Researchers at Kansas State University found that cinnamon fights the E. coli bacteria in unpasteurized juices. It is also a great source of manganese, fiber, iron, and calcium.

New research is currently being developed on the amazing effects of cinnamon. All of this information proves that cinnamon is an extremely beneficial herb for promoting overall wellness.

Click Here For More Information on Cinnamon.

Sources: Khan, MS, PHD, Alam, Safdar, MS, Mahpara, Ali Khan, MS, PHD, Mohammad Muzaffar, Khattak, MS, Khan Nawaz, and Anderson, PHD, Richard A.. “Cinnamon Improves Glucose and Lipids of People With Type 2 Diabetes.” Diabetes Care 26(2003): 3215-3218.

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Using Vanadium – Vanadyl Sulfate to Control Blood Sugar

Vanadium, commonly taken as vanadyl sulfate, is another contested substance. There have been claims made about its effects of lowering insulin requirements and even preserving beta cell function, but skeptics say
side effects are harmful. Vanadium has been studied throughout the 1990s. In 1996 the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx, published in May 1996 Diabetes, reported that vanadyl sulfate improved type 2 Diabetes’ insulin sensitivity.

As time went on, studies either verified or disputed this conclusion. One said it has no effect in type diabetes (December 1998 Diabetes Care). Another demonstrated that it “restored elevated blood glucose to normal” in diabetic rats.

John Walsh, PA, CDE, coauthor of “Stop the Rollercoaster,” wants more long-term, human studies done, because vanadyl sulfate in high doses has also shown toxic side effects in animals, including kidney damage and oxidation
of fats, leading to cardiovascular disease.

Walsh concludes, “Vanadium or one of its derivatives may someday help improve blood sugar…” but “too many unknowns surround this mineral today.”

Scientists are working on different formulations of vanadium besides vanadyl sulfate for dietary supplementation. Natural Health magazine says 5 to 25 milligrams per day is a safe amount.

Herbs for Diabetes: Evening Primrose Oil

Gamma-linolenic acid (Evening Primrose Oil) has been shown to improve nerves that have been damaged from diabetes. Its natural sources are evening primrose oil and borage oil. Testing of both alpha-lipoic acid and gamma-linolenic acid in combination for diabetes treatment has been coduced in recent years.

Researchers from the University of Aberdeen found promise for future studies of gamma-linolenic acid and alpha-lipoic acid in humans. The April 1998 Diabetologia, revealed the effects of alpha-lipoic acid, gamma-linolenic acid and other essential fatty acid ingestion on the nerve
function of diabetic rats. The conclusion was that the combination improved
the rats’ nerve function and is “worthy of consideration for clinical
trials.”

A few months later, another study confirmed this evidence. The July
Diabetologia told of a British study, also of alpha-lipoic acid and gamma-
linolenic acid on diabetic rats. The final word was the combination “is
effective in improving both electrophysiological and neurochemical” aspects
of experimental neuropathy.

Natural Health recommends 200 to 500 milligrams per day of gamma-linolenic
acid
for people with diabetes.

Alpha Lipoic Acid: Antioxidant Supplement for Diabetes

Alpha Lipoic Acid is prescribed in Germany for adult onset of diabetes. There it has been shown to help for the following reasons:

  • Alpha Lipoic Acid increases the sugar burning ability of insulin
  • Alpha Lipoic Acid decreases insulin resistance
  • Alpha Lipoic Acid increases ATP production
  • Alpha Lipoic Acid decreases the symptoms of diabetic neuropathy

Alpha-lipoic acid has produced convincing evidence of it’s abilty to aid in glucose control. It has also proven to be a strong antioxidant in the fight against diabetes. In a recent human studies, alpha-lipoic acid alone, significantly reduced glucose levels in type 2 Diabetes. A study published in Diabetes Care in February 2009, shows German doctors gave lean and obese type 2 Diabetes Patients 600 milligrams of alpha-lipoic acid twice per day. Although more drastic changes were noted in lean people, both groups had lower fasting glucose concentrations.

Researchers believe that alpha-lipoic acid works by lowering the levels of lactate and pyruvate that are increased after people ingest carbohydrates. Lactate and pyruvate are products of the digestive process that can lead to damage like lactic acidosis. Other studies have led to similar conclusions of alpha-lipoic acid’s beneficial effects on blood glucose levels. ABC news did a television story on its power as an antioxidant, and an entire book has been written about it.

“Lipoic Acid in Health and Disease” is edited by Jurgen Fuchs, MD, PhD, and Guido Zimmer, MD, PhD, of Johann Wolfgang Goethe University in Frankfurt, Germany, and Lester Packer, PhD, of the University of California, Berkeley.
The book contains numerous studies with evidence that alpha-lipoic acid fights insulin resistance and neuropathy.

Natural Health magazine says in its “Consumer Guide to Vitamins & Minerals,” July-August 1998 issue, “100 to 600 milligrams per day is a helpful amount of alpha-lipoic acid for people with diabetes.”

Herbs for Diabetes – Gymnema Sylvestre

Gymnema Sylvestre contains Gurmenic acid which has structure similar to saccharose, (used in the making of certain sweetners). Extracts of Gymnema can curb sweet tooths and diabetic sweet cravings. Some people use the herb to fight sugar cravings, as it can reduce or dilute the taste of sugar when it is placed in the mouth. Extract from the leaves contains Gymnemic acids, which exhibit anti-sweet activity, the effect of this activity lasts for about 15 minutes.

Gymnema Sylvestre is currently being used in some countries as a natural medication for diabetes. Combined with other ingredients such as cinnamon, chromium, zinc, biotin, banaba, huckleberry and bitter melon, it has shown positive effects.

*In 2005, a study made by King’s College, London, United Kingdom, showed that a water-soluble extract of Gymnema Sylvestre, caused reversible increases in intracellular calcium and insulin secretion in mouse and human β-cells when used at a concentration (0.125 mg/ml) without compromising cell viability. Hence forth these data suggest that extracts derived from Gymnema Sylvestre may be useful as therapeutic agents for the stimulation of insulin secretion in individuals.